Differences between young and older adults in physiological and subjective responses to emotion induction using films


  • 1.

    Scheibe, S. & Carstensen, L. L. Emotional aging: recent findings and future trends. J. Gerontol. Ser. B Psychol. Sci. Soc. Sci. 65B, 135–144. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbp132 (2010).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 2.

    Mather, M. The affective neuroscience of aging. Annu. Rev. Psychol. 67, 213–238. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-psych-122414-033540 (2016).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 3.

    Carstensen, L. L. Evidence for a life-span theory of socioemotional selectivity. Curr. Dir. Psychol. Sci. 4, 151–156. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8721.ep11512261 (1995).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 4.

    Charles, S. T. & Luong, G. Emotional experience across adulthood. Curr. Dir. Psychol. Sci. 22, 443–448. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721413497013 (2013).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 5.

    Piazza, J. R., Charles, S. T., Stawski, R. S. & Almeida, D. M. Age and the association between negative affective states and diurnal cortisol. Psychol. Aging 28, 47–56. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029983 (2013).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 6.

    Mather, M. & Carstensen, L. L. Aging and motivated cognition: the positivity effect in attention and memory. Trends Cogn. Sci. 9, 496–502. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2005.08.005 (2005).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 7.

    Carstensen, L. L. & DeLiema, M. The positivity effect: a negativity bias in youth fades with age. Curr. Opin. Behav. Sci. 19, 7–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2017.07.009 (2018).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 8.

    Schweizer, S. et al. Age-related decline in positive emotional reactivity and emotion regulation in a population-derived cohort. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/2eypg (2018).

  • 9.

    Streubel, B. & Kunzmann, U. Age differences in emotional reactions: arousal and age-relevance count. Psychol. Aging 26, 966–978. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0023424 (2011).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 10.

    Seider, B. H., Shiota, M. N., Whalen, P. & Levenson, R. W. Greater sadness reactivity in late life. Soc. Cogn. Affect. Neurosci. 6, 186–194. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsq069 (2011).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 11.

    Kunzmann, U. & Gruhn, D. Age differences in emotional reactivity: the sample case of sadness. Psychol. Aging 20, 47–59. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.20.1.47 (2005).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 12.

    Uchino, B. N., Birmingham, W. & Berg, C. A. Are older adults less or more physiologically reactive? A meta-analysis of age-related differences in cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory tasks. J. Gerontol. Ser. B Psychol. Sci. Soc. Sci. 65, 154–162. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbp127 (2010).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 13.

    Tsai, J. L., Levenson, R. W. & Carstensen, L. L. Autonomic, subjective, and expressive responses to emotional films in older and younger Chinese Americans and European Americans. Psychol. Aging 15, 684–693 (2000).

    CAS 
    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 14.

    Beaudreau, S. A., MacKay, A. & Storandt, M. Older adults’ responses to emotional stimuli: a cautionary note. Exp. Aging Res. 35, 235–249. https://doi.org/10.1080/03610730902720513 (2009).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 15.

    Sheppes, G. Emotion regulation choice: theory. In Handbook of Emotion Regulation (ed Gross, J. J.) 126–139 (Guilford, New York, 2014).


    Google Scholar
     

  • 16.

    Kunzmann, U. & Richter, D. Emotional reactivity across the adult life span: the cognitive pragmatics make a difference. Psychol. Aging 24, 879–889. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017347 (2009).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 17.

    Korpal, P. & Jankowiak, K. Physiological and self-report measures in emotion studies: methodological considerations. Pol. Psychol. Bull. 49, 475–481. https://doi.org/10.24425/124345 (2018).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 18.

    Kunzmann, U., Rohr, M., Wieck, C., Kappes, C. & Wrosch, C. Speaking about feelings: further evidence for multidirectional age differences in anger and sadness. Psychol. Aging 32, 93–103. https://doi.org/10.1037/pag0000142 (2017).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 19.

    Harmon-Jones, E., Harmon-Jones, C. & Summerell, E. On the importance of both dimensional and discrete models of emotion. Behav. Sci https://doi.org/10.3390/bs7040066 (2017).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 20.

    Gruber, J., Mennin, D. S., Fields, A., Purcell, A. & Murray, G. Heart rate variability as a potential indicator of positive valence system disturbance: a proof of concept investigation. Int. J. Psychophysiol. 98, 240–248. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.08.005 (2015).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 21.

    McGinley, J. J. & Friedman, B. H. Autonomic specificity in emotion: the induction method matters. Int. J. Psychophysiol. 118, 48–57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2017.06.002 (2017).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 22.

    Rottenberg, J., Ray, R. D. & Gross, J. J. Emotion elicitation using films. In Handbook of Emotion Elicitation and Assessment Series in Affective Science. (ed. Coan, J. A. & Allen, J. J. B.) 9–28 (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2007).


    Google Scholar
     

  • 23.

    Stephens, C. L., Christie, I. C. & Friedman, B. H. Autonomic specificity of basic emotions: evidence from pattern classification and cluster analysis. Biol. Psychol. 84, 463–473. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2010.03.014 (2010).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 24.

    Gross, J. J. & Levenson, R. W. Emotion elicitation using films. Cogn. Emot. 9, 87–108. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699939508408966 (1995).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 25.

    Evers, C. et al. Emotion response coherence: a dual-process perspective. Biol. Psychol. 98, 43–49. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.11.003 (2014).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 26.

    Fajula, C., Bonin-Guillaume, S., Jouve, E. & Blin, O. Emotional reactivity assessment of healthy elderly with an emotion-induction procedure. Exp. Aging Res. 39, 109–124. https://doi.org/10.1080/0361073X.2013.741961 (2013).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 27.

    Chou, K.-L., Lee, T. M. C. & Ho, A. H. Y. Does mood state change risk taking tendency in older adults?. Psychol. Aging 22, 310–318. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.22.2.310 (2007).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 28.

    Fernández-Aguilar, L., Ricarte, J., Ros, L. & Latorre, J. M. Emotional differences in young and older adults: films as mood induction procedure. Front. Psychol. 9, 1110–1110. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01110 (2018).

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 29.

    Rosenberg, E. L. & Ekman, P. Coherence between expressive and experiential systems in emotion. Cogn. Emot. 8, 201–229 (1994).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 30.

    Russell, A. A circumplex model of affect. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 39, 1161–1178. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0077714 (1980).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 31.

    Schaefer, A., Nils, F., Sanchez, X. & Philippot, P. Assessing the effectiveness of a large database of emotion-eliciting films: a new tool for emotion researchers. Cogn. Emot. 24, 1153–1172. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699930903274322 (2010).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 32.

    Shiota, M. N., Neufeld, S. L., Yeung, W. H., Moser, S. E. & Perea, E. F. Feeling good: autonomic nervous system responding in five positive emotions. Emotion 11, 1368–1378. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0024278 (2011).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 33.

    Hewig, J. et al. A revised film set for the induction of basic emotions. Cogn. Emot. 19, 1095–1109. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699930541000084 (2005).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 34.

    Whitton, A. E., Henry, J. D., Rendell, P. G. & Grisham, J. R. Disgust, but not anger provocation, enhances levator labii superioris activity during exposure to moral transgressions. Biol. Psychol. 96, 48–56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.11.012 (2014).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 35.

    Gilman, T. L. et al. A film set for the elicitation of emotion in research: a comprehensive catalog derived from four decades of investigation. Behav. Res. Methods 49, 2061–2082. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-016-0842-x (2017).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 36.

    Salerno, J. M. & Peter-Hagene, L. C. The interactive effect of anger and disgust on moral outrage and judgments. Psychol. Sci. 24, 2069–2078. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797613486988 (2013).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 37.

    Charles, S. T. Viewing injustice: greater emotion heterogeneity with age. Psychol. Aging 20, 159–164. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.20.1.159 (2005).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 38.

    Kliegel, M., Jäger, T. & Phillips, L. H. Emotional development across adulthood: differential age-related emotional reactivity and emotion regulation in a negative mood induction procedure. Int. J. Aging Hum. Dev. 64, 217–244. https://doi.org/10.2190/U48Q-0063-3318-1175 (2007).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 39.

    Labouvie-Vief, G., Lumley, M. A., Jain, E. & Heinze, H. Age and gender differences in cardiac reactivity and subjective emotion responses to emotional autobiographical memories. Emotion 3, 115–126. https://doi.org/10.1037/1528-3542.3.2.115 (2003).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 40.

    Jenkins, L. M. & Andrewes, D. G. A new set of standardised verbal and nonverbal contemporary film stimuli for the elicitation of emotions. Brain Impair. 13, 212–227. https://doi.org/10.1017/BrImp.2012.18 (2012).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 41.

    Mauss, I. B., Levenson, R. W., McCarter, L., Wilhelm, F. H. & Gross, J. J. The tie that binds? Coherence among emotion experience, behavior, and physiology. Emotion 5, 175–190. https://doi.org/10.1037/1528-3542.5.2.175 (2005).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 42.

    Charles, S. T. & Piazza, J. R. Memories of social interactions: age differences in emotional intensity. Psychol. Aging 22, 300–309. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.22.2.300 (2007).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 43.

    Ferrari, V., Bruno, N., Chattat, R. & Codispoti, M. Evaluative ratings and attention across the life span: emotional arousal and gender. Cogn. Emot. 31, 552–563. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2016.1140020 (2017).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 44.

    Pinquart, M. Correlates of subjective health in older adults: a meta-analysis. Psychol. Aging 16, 414–426. https://doi.org/10.1037/0882-7974.16.3.414 (2001).

    CAS 
    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 45.

    Stone, A. A., Schwartz, J. E., Broderick, J. E. & Deaton, A. A snapshot of the age distribution of psychological well-being in the United States. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 9985–9990. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1003744107 (2010).

    ADS 
    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 46.

    Strack, F. & Deutsch, R. Reflective and impulsive determinants of social behavior. Personal. Soc. Psychol. Rev. 8, 220–247. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0803_1 (2004).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 47.

    Bonanno, G. A. & Keltner, D. The coherence of emotion systems: comparing “on-line” measures of appraisal and facial expressions, and self-report. Cogn. Emot. 18, 431–444. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699930341000149 (2004).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 48.

    Barrett, L. F. Are emotions natural kinds?. Perspect. Psychol. Sci. 1, 28–58. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6916.2006.00003.x (2006).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 49.

    Cacioppo, J. T., Berntson, G. G., Bechara, A., Tranel, D. & Hawkley, L. C. Could an aging brain contribute to subjective well-being?: The value added by a social neuroscience perspective. In Social Neuroscience: Toward Understanding the Underpinnings of the Social Mind (eds. Todorov, S., Fiske, T. & Prentice, D. A.) 249–262 (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2011).


    Google Scholar
     

  • 50.

    Levenson, R. W. In Psychology and the Aging Revolution: How We Adapt to Longer Life. (eds. Qualls, S. H. & Abeles, N.) 123–140 (American Psychological Association, Washington, 2000).

  • 51.

    Scheibe, S. & Sheppes, G. Distract or reappraise? Age-related differences in emotion-regulation choice. Emotion 15, 677–681. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0039246 (2015).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 52.

    Labouvie-Vief, G. Dynamic integration. Curr. Dir. Psychol. Sci. 12, 201–206. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.0963-7214.2003.01262.x (2003).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 53.

    Larsen, J. T., Hershfield, H. E., Stastny, B. J. & Hester, N. On the relationship between positive and negative affect: their correlation and their co-occurrence. Emotion 17, 323–336. https://doi.org/10.1037/emo0000231 (2017).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 54.

    Ready, R. E., Carvalho, J. O. & Weinberger, M. I. Emotional complexity in younger, midlife, and older adults. Psychol. Aging 23, 928–933. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014003 (2008).

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 55.

    Friedman, B. H., Stephens, C. L. & Thayer, J. F. Redundancy analysis of autonomic and self-reported, responses to induced emotions. Biol. Psychol. 98, 19–28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.12.006 (2014).

    Article 
    PubMed 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 56.

    Scheibe, S., Sheppes, G. & Staudinger, U. M. Distract or reappraise? Age-related differences in emotion-regulation choice. Emotion 15, 677–681 (2015).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 57.

    Larcom, M. J. & Isaacowitz, D. M. Rapid emotion regulation after mood induction: age and individual differences. J. Gerontol. Ser. B Psychol. Sci. Soc. Sci 64B, 733–741. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbp077 (2009).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 58.

    Stanley, J. T., Lohani, M. & Isaacowitz, D. M. Age-related differences in judgments of inappropriate behavior are related to humor style preferences. Psychol. Aging 29, 528–541. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0036666 (2014).

    Article 
    PubMed 
    PubMed Central 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 59.

    American, A. P. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5ª edn (Editorial Médica Panamericana, Villanueva de la Cañada, 2014).

  • 60.

    Folstein, M. F., Folstein, S. E. & McHugh, P. R. “Mini-mental state”. A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. J. Psychiatr. Res. 12, 189–198 (1975).

    CAS 
    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 61.

    Beck, A. T., Ward, C. H., Mendelson, M., Mock, J. & Erbaugh, J. An inventory for measuring depression. Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 4, 561–571 (1961).

    CAS 
    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 62.

    Kendall, P. C., Hollon, S. D., Beck, A. T., Hammen, C. & Ingram, R. E. Issues and recommendations regarding use of the Beck Depression Inventory. Cogn. Ther. Res. 11, 289–299. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01186280 (1987).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 63.

    Bradley, M. M. & Lang, P. J. Measuring emotion: the self-assessment manikin and the semantic differential. J. Behav. Ther. Exp. Psychiatry 25, 49–59 (1994).

    CAS 
    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 64.

    Izard, C. E., Dougherty, F. E., Bloxom, B. M. & Kotsch, N. E. The Differential Emotions Scale: A Method of Measuring the Meaning of Subjective Experience of Discrete Emotions (Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology, Nashville, 1974).


    Google Scholar
     

  • 65.

    McHugo, G. J., Smith, C. A. & Lanzetta, J. T. The structure of self-reports of emotional responses to film segments. Motiv. Emot. 6, 365–385. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00998191 (1982).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 66.

    Zangróniz, R., Martínez-Rodrigo, A., Pastor, J. M., López, M. T. & Fernández-Caballero, A. Electrodermal activity sensor for classification of calm/distress condition. Sensors 17, 2324 (2017).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 67.

    Zangróniz, R., Martínez-Rodrigo, A., López, M. T., Pastor, J. M. & Fernández-Caballero, A. Estimation of mental distress from photoplethysmography. Appl. Sci. 8, 69 (2018).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 68.

    Malik, M. Heart rate variability. Ann. Noninvasive Electrocardiol. 1, 151–181. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1542-474X.1996.tb00275.x (1996).

    ADS 
    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 69.

    Nitzan, M., Babchenko, A. & Khanokh, B. Verylow frequency variability in arterial blood pressure and blood volume pulse. Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 37, 54–58 (1999).

    CAS 
    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 70.

    Martinez-Rodrigo, A., Alcaraz, R. & Rieta, J. J. Application of the phasor transform for automatic delineation of single-lead ECG fiducial points. Physiol. Meas. 31, 1467–1485. https://doi.org/10.1088/0967-3334/31/11/005 (2010).

    Article 

    Google Scholar
     

  • 71.

    Boucsein, W. Electrodermal Activity (Springer Science & Business Media, New York, NY, 2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1126-0.


    Google Scholar
     

  • 72.

    Fernández, C., Mateos, J. C., Ribaudi, J. & Fernández-Abascal, E. Spanish validation of an emotion-eliciting set of films. Psicothema 23, 778–785 (2011).


    Google Scholar
     

  • 73.

    StataCorp. Stata Statistical Software: Release 15 (StataCorp LLC, College Station, 2017).

  • 74.

    R Core Team. R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, 2018).


    Google Scholar
     

  • 75.

    Wickham, H. ggplot2: Elegant Graphics for Data Analysis (Springer, New York, 2016).


    Google Scholar
     



  • Source link

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *